deaf


Definition: Meaning of, deaf in English to English dictionary.

Pronunciation: / dɛf /

  • adjective
  • synonym
  • antonym
Word Forms:
Positive Comparative Superlative
deaf deafer deafest
  1. physically unable to hear anything or unable to hear well [↪  hearing impaired]
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  2. the deaf [plural] people who are deaf
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  3. be deaf to something literary to be unwilling to hear or listen to something
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  4. turn a deaf ear (to something) to be unwilling to listen to what someone is saying or asking
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  5. fall on deaf ears if advice or a warning falls on deaf ears, everyone ignores it
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synonym
antonym

deaf used in phrases

  • deaf as a post (adjective)
    1. totally deaf; unable to hear anything
  • deaf mute (noun)
    1. old-fashioned, not polite someone who is unable to hear or speak
  • deaf person (noun)
    1. a person with a severe auditory impairment
  • deaf-aid (noun)
    1. an electronic device that amplifies sound and is worn to compensate for poor hearing
  • deaf-and-dumb (adjective)
    1. lacking the sense of hearing and the ability to speak
  • deaf-and-dumb person (noun)
    1. a deaf person who is unable to speak
  • deaf-mute (adjective)
    1. lacking the sense of hearing and the ability to speak
    deaf-mute (noun)
    1. a deaf person who is unable to speak
  • deaf-muteness (noun)
    1. congenital deafness that results in inability to speak
  • deaf-mutism (noun)
    1. congenital deafness that results in inability to speak
  • profoundly deaf (adjective)
    1. totally deaf; unable to hear anything
  • More

word of the day

Pronunciation: wɪljəm ðə ˈkɒŋkərə
Parts of Speech:
(1027-1087) the king of England from 1066 until his death. He was also called William I . William was the Duke of Normandy (in northern France), and became king of England by defeating King Harold at the Battle of HASTINGS in 1066. His arrival brought great changes in English society, and people see it as the end of the Anglo-Saxon period and the beginning of the Middle Ages.